AMPHIBIAWEB
Strongylopus fuelleborni
Fulleborn's Stream Frog
family: Pyxicephalidae
subfamily: Cacosterninae
Conservation Status (definitions)
IUCN (Red List) Status Least Concern (LC)
CITES
Other International Status None
National Status None
Regional Status None

Country distribution from AmphibiaWeb's database: Malawi, Mozambique, Tanzania, United Republic of

 

View distribution map using BerkeleyMapper.

   

From the Encyclopedia of Life account:

Taxonomic Notes

Channing and Davenport (2002) synonymized this species with Strongylopus merumontanus; however, Poynton (2004) shows that S. merumontanus is a separate species known only from higher elevations on Mount Meru in northern Tanzania.


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Size

Males are up to 40 mm in snout-vent length, while females are up to 53 mm (Harper et al., 2010).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Diagnostic Description

This is a slender, long-legged frog with extremely long toes. The snout is pointy. A dark line runs from the snout to the eye and continues under the eye, across the tympanum to the base of the arm. A pale stripe runs from below the eye to the arm under the dark band. There is a pair of distinct skin ridges that begin behind the eye and run to the vent. These ridges are outlined in black and have a lighter color between them that forms a middorsal stripe. The stripe may be tan or greenish. There are also broken parallel ridges on the dorsum. The tibia is approximately ¾ SVL. There is only a small amount of webbing at the base of the toes (Text from Harper et al., 2010).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Comparisons

This species is similar to the Ptychadena species, but has only a very minimal amount of webbing.The extremely long toes are distinctive. There is still some disagreement regarding the species boundary between S. fuelleborni and S. merumontanus, which some taxonomists consider to occur only on Mt. Meru (Text from Harper et al., 2010).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Habitat and Ecology

This species is found in montane grasslands at elevations between 1500 and 3000 m (Harper et al., 2010).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Advertisement Call

Pickersgill (2007) describes the call as “a breathy whistle, repeated singly or in sets of two or rarely three.”


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Reproduction

Breeding takes place in grassland streams. Eggs are laid under dense vegetation at the edges of streams and tadpoles hatch and develop in the water (Text from Harper et al., 2010).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/