AMPHIBIAWEB
Strongylopus grayii
Gray's stream frog
family: Pyxicephalidae
subfamily: Cacosterninae

© 2011 Martin Pickersgill (1 of 5)
Conservation Status (definitions)
IUCN (Red List) Status Least Concern (LC)
CITES
Other International Status None
National Status None
Regional Status None

Country distribution from AmphibiaWeb's database: Lesotho, Mozambique, South Africa, Swaziland, Zimbabwe. Introduced: Saint Helena.

 

View distribution map using BerkeleyMapper.

   

From the Encyclopedia of Life account:

Distribution

S. grayii distribution includes South Africa, Lesotho, and Swaziland (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: Channing, A.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Habitat and Ecology

S. grayii occurs from sea level to 1800 m in the mountains of Lesotho and Swaziland

This species is found in the winter-rainfall region of Western Cape Province, and in the summer-rainfall region to the North. Annual rainfall is 250–2000 mm in the winter-rainfall region, and 500–1000 mm summer-rainfall region. The species inhabits the entire Fynbos Biome as well as parts of the Succulent Karoo, Nama Karoo, Savanna, Grassland, Thicket and Forest biomes. Outside the relatively temperate, southwestern parts of its range, S. grayii is largely restricted to uplands (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: Channing, A.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Associations

The Yellow-billed Egret Egretta intermedia has been observed preying on these frogs in the southwest (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: Channing, A.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Metamorphosis

In wet weather, tadpoles emerge from the egg capsules after 5 days and enter the water, but in dry weather they can survive in the capsules for as long as 63 days (Hewitt 1937). Wager (1965) and Du Preez (1996) record development takes place over a period of 3–6 months (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: Channing, A.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Advertisement Call

Males call throughout the day and night in the rainy season. The call site is often well concealed by vegetation or leaf litter at the water’s edge and the males are cryptic and difficult to locate (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: Channing, A.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Reproduction

This is one of the few frog species that breeds in the winter in the winter-rainfall region and in summer in the summer-rainfall region (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: Channing, A.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

IUCN Red List Category and Justification of Conservation Status

This widespread and abundant species is not threatened or in need of specific conservation action (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: Channing, A.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/