AMPHIBIAWEB
Ptychadena uzungwensis
Udzungwa ridged frog
family: Ptychadenidae
Conservation Status (definitions)
IUCN (Red List) Status Least Concern (LC)
CITES
Other International Status None
National Status None
Regional Status None

Country distribution from AmphibiaWeb's database: Angola, Burundi, Congo, the Democratic Republic of the, Malawi, Mozambique, Rwanda, Tanzania, United Republic of, Zambia, Zimbabwe

 

View distribution map using BerkeleyMapper.

   

From the Encyclopedia of Life account:

Distribution

P. uzungwensis is recorded from Tanzania, Rwanda and Burundi, southward to Angola, Zambia, Zimbabwe and central Mozambique (Stewart 1967; Poynton and Broadley1985b; Channing 2001). The species is also found in South Africa, Lesotho, and Swaziland (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: Minter,L.R.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Size

Males are up to 42 mm and females 48 mm in snout-vent length (Harper et al., 2010).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Diagnostic Description

This is a medium-sized frog with parallel ridges on the dorsum that are broken rather than continuous. The dorsal color is dark brown with darker brown spots. There are two distinct ridges on the snout. Light dorsolateral folds of skin run along each side of the body. There is a light middorsal stripe. The back of the thigh is faintly spotted and in some individuals the spots join to form a horizontal band. Three joints of the longest toe are free of webbing. Males have yellow throats and yellow patches near the groin (Text from Harper et al., 2010).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Comparisons

P. uzungwensis has a pair of ridges on the snout and the backs of the thighs are not striped distinguishing this species from others in the genus (Text from Harper et al., 2010).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Habitat and Ecology

P. uzungwensis inhabits medium- to high-altitude grassland at 800–2300 m in the vicinity of pools and seepages (Stewart 1967). This species is inactive during the dry season. Loveridge (1953) unearthed a dormant individual in August on the Lichenya Plateau on the southwestern side of the Mulanje Massif, Malawi. In the wet season, adults are found in the grass near their breeding sites (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).

This species is found in wet grasslands at moderate to high elevations (800 – 2300 m; Harper et al., 2010).


Author: Minter,L.R.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Associations

Food consists primarily of insects and spiders (Inger and Marx 1961; Stewart 1967) as well Channing (2001) reported prey as snails and other frogs (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: Minter,L.R.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Advertisement Call

The call is a typical trill (Minter et al., 2004; Harper et al., 2010).


Authors: Zimkus, Breda; Minter,L.R.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Reproduction

Details of the breeding biology of this species are unknown (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).

Breeding takes place in shallow water (Harper et al., 2010).


Authors: Zimkus, Breda; Minter,L.R.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

IUCN Red List Category and Justification of Conservation Status

P. uzungwensis has an extremely peripheral distribution and is known from only a few localities. It is threatened by habitat loss from afforestation and other agricultural activities (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: Minter, L.R.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/