AMPHIBIAWEB
Ptychadena cooperi
family: Ptychadenidae
Conservation Status (definitions)
IUCN (Red List) Status Least Concern (LC)
CITES
Other International Status None
National Status None
Regional Status None

Country distribution from AmphibiaWeb's database: Ethiopia

 

View distribution map using BerkeleyMapper.

   

From the Encyclopedia of Life account:

Distribution

This species is endemic to the highlands of central Ethiopia west of the Rift Valley, and southern Ethiopia east of the Rift Valley (Largen, 2004).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Morphology

The head is broader than long. Vomerine teeth are absent, although a female paratype exhibited a single vomerine tooth on the left side close to the inner anterior corner of the choana. The upper lip is white or greyish. The snout is prominent and rounded terminally, measuring one and one-third or one and one-half the diameter of the eye. There is a dark streak from the end of the snout through the nostril and eye, broadening behind the eye to include the whole of the tympanum. This species exhbits a short and white glandular ridge from the angle of the mouth to the front of the shoulder. Canthus rostralis is obtuse, and the loreal region is very oblique and not concave. The nostril is midway between eye and end of snout. The interorbital space is as broad as the upper eyelid. The tympanum is distinct and 3/5 the diameter of the eye. The tibio-tarsal articulation reaches between the eye and the end of the snout. The tibia is three times as long as broad, its length contained once and four-fifths in the distance from snout to vent. The lengh of the tarsus may be half the distance between the snout and the vent. The first finger is the shortest, followed by the second, which is shorter than the fourth. The third finger is slightly longer than the snout. The toes are half-webbed and the third is slightly longer than the fifth. Presence of a small inner tubercule and without an outer metatarsal. Has a slight tarsal fold and lacks a tarsal tubercule.

The back has longitudinal rows of short, very indistinct or well defined, glandular folds and is brownish grey with small indistinct dark spots, and a fine white mid-dorsal stripe from snout to vent. The underside is smooth, and coloration is white with pale brown reticulation. A fold is present across the chest. The hind limbs have indistinct crossbars. The hinder side of thighs is dark, with numerous small, round, white spots. Small vocal sacs show externally, through short slits close to the angle of the mouth, but not extending backwards beyond it.


Author: Farooq, Harith
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Size

Snout to vent length of male holotype is 45 mm; forelimb measures 25 mm and hind limb 80 mm.


Author: Farooq, Harith
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Diagnostic Description

Holotype (a ♂), number 1927.7.5.15, British Museum, from Wouramboulchi, Ethiopia.


Author: Farooq, Harith
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Comparisons

Differs from Rana aberae Ahl, 1925 (synonymized with P. anchietae), also from Ethiopia, in its shorter hind limbs, less fully webbed toes, differently proportioned fingers and toes, and vermiculate belly.


Author: Farooq, Harith
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Habitat and Ecology

This species is distributed in montane grassland and occasionally forest-edge habitats at 2,500-3,100 m. It can be found in disturbed habitats (Largen, 2004).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Reproduction

Ptychadena cooperi breeds in permanent pools, temporary rain-fed pools and flooded fields (Largen, 2004).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

IUCN Red List Category and Justification of Conservation Status

This species is listed as Least Concern because it is common and adaptable, although its Extent of Occurrence is probably not much greater than 20,000 km2. It is locally common in suitable habitat, and can sometimes be found in large numbers (Largen, 2004).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Threats

This species is threatened by habitat degradation as a result of human expansion and settlement (Largen, 2004).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/