AMPHIBIAWEB
Phrynobatrachus rouxi
family: Phrynobatrachidae
Conservation Status (definitions)
IUCN (Red List) Status Data Deficient (DD)
CITES
Other International Status None
National Status None
Regional Status None

Country distribution from AmphibiaWeb's database: Congo, the Democratic Republic of the, Uganda

 

View distribution map using BerkeleyMapper.

   

From the Encyclopedia of Life account:

Etymology

This species was named in honor of J. Roux, a herpetologist from the Natural History Museum in Basel, Switzerland.


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Taxonomic Notes

Laurent (1972) considered this species to be a synonym of Phrynobatrachus calcaratus, and Perret (in Pickersgill and Howell, 2004) believed that it might be conspecific with P. cornutus. M.-O. Rödel (pers. comm.) reports that although there are warts present on the eyelid, there is no eyelid spine present on the holotype specimen. Therefore, this species is clearly not conspecific with either P. calcaratus nor with P. cornutus.


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Summary

Phrynobatrachus rouxi is a small sized species (SVL < 23 mm) of puddle frog known only from the type locality in southern Uganda. Members of this genus are identified by the presence of a midtarsal tubercle, elongate inner metatarsal tubercle, and outer metatarsal tubercle. This species is characterized by a barely visible tympanum, digital tips that are only slightly widened, and minute spinules on the tibia, tarsus, and underside of the foot, as well as asperities on the flanks.


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Distribution

This species is known only from the type locality, Buddu Forest, in southern Uganda along the western shore of Lake Victoria, although the exact location is not clear. It has also been reported from Mount Kenya, but this requires confirmation (Pickersgill and Howell, 2004).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Morphology

A median conical papilla is present on the tongue. The head is approximately as broad as it is long. The snout is as long as the eye diameter and barely pointed. Canthus rostralis is indistinct. The nostril is equidistant from the eye and the snout tip. The interorbital area is considerably broader than the upper lid. The tympanum is only slightly visible. The tips of the fingers and toes are only slightly widened. The first finger is significantly shorter than second. The toes are moderately long and half webbed. Channing and Howell (2006) report that 3 phalanges on toe IV are free of webbing. An oval internal metatarsal tubercle and a small round outer metatarsal tubercle are present. A smaller tarsal tubercle is also present at the interior edge of the tarsus. The tarsal tubercle is connected to the inner metatarsal tubercle by a fine skin fold; the distance between the tarsal and inner metatarsal tubercles is somewhat smaller than that between the two metatarsal tubercles. The tibiotarsal joint reaches the eye when the leg is bent. A short glandular fold and small warts are arranged in longitudinal rows are found behind each eye. The ventral surface is smooth (Nieden, 1912). Minute spinules are present on the tibia, tarsus, and underside of the foot, and asperities are present on the flanks (Channing and Howell, 2006).

Dorsum is dark-brown, and a thin vertebral line may be present. Warts are a somewhat lighter brown, making them noticeable. Hind limbs have dark transverse banding. Ventral surface of the throat and chest is brownish. The belly and underside of limbs are yellowish (Nieden, 1913).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Size

The holotype measured 16 mm (Nieden, 1913). Channing and Howell (2006) report that the males and females reach 23 mm in length.


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Diagnostic Description

Phrynobatrachus rouxi is a small sized species (SVL < 23 mm) characterized by a barely visible tympanum, digital tips that are only slightly widened, and minute spinules on the tibia, tarsus, and underside of the foot, as well as asperities on the flanks.


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Population Biology

The population status of this species is unknown.There do not appear to be any recent records, presumably due to taxonomic confusion, and due to a lack of herpetological work within its range (Pickersgill and Howell, 2004).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

IUCN Red List Category and Justification of Conservation Status

The IUCN Red List (2009) categorizes this species as Data Deficient in view of continuing doubts as to its taxonomic validity as well as absence of recent information on its extent of occurrence, status and ecological requirements (Pickersgill and Howell, 2004).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/