AMPHIBIAWEB
Phrynobatrachus giorgii
family: Phrynobatrachidae
Conservation Status (definitions)
IUCN (Red List) Status Data Deficient (DD)
CITES
Other International Status None
National Status None
Regional Status None

Country distribution from AmphibiaWeb's database: Cameroon, Congo, the Democratic Republic of the

 

View distribution map using BerkeleyMapper.

   

From the Encyclopedia of Life account:

Etymology

This species is named for its collector, M. de Giorgi.


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Distribution

This species is known only from its type locality at Yambata in northern Democratic Republic of Congo, and the exact location of the type locality is unknown (Channing, 2004).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Morphology

This species is raniform in appearance. A clearly visible conical papilla extends from the center of the tongue. The head is longer than it is wide, with a short snout only as long as the eye. The canthus rostralis is angular and highly accentuated. The frenal region is almost vertical but very lightly concave. The width of the interorbital space is slightly greater than or equal to the width of the upper eyelid. The tympanum is more or less distinct, measuring one-half to two-thirds of the diameter of the eye (de Witte, 1921).

The first two digits are equally long and about two-thirds of the length of the third. The tips of the toes are expanded into small but well developed discs. The toes are three-fourths webbed, with expanded terminal discs slightly more developed than those of the fingers. Subarticular tubercles are prominent and more developed on the forelimbs than on the hindlimbs. There is a well developed, oval-shaped internal metatarsal tubercle and a smaller, round external metatarsal tubercle. A small, round tubercle is present on the internal side of the tarsus, connected to the internal metatarsal tubercle by a cutaneous fold. The distance between the two metatarsal tubercles is larger than that between the internal metatarsal tubercle and the tarsal tubercle. The hind limb comes forward alongside the body. The tibio-tarsal joint reaches the anterior side of the eye. The snout-vent length is 1 3/4 times the length of the tibia, which is about 3 1/2 times as long as it is wide. When the thighs are bent at a right angle to the axis of the body, the tibias overlap (de Witte, 1921).

The dorsal skin is finely granular and more or less warty. A cutaneous fold extends to the shoulder from behind the eye. Oblique, narrow, glandular swellings or lines extend from beyind the upper eyelid and extend to the scapular region or between the hindlimbs. These swellings may be curved or angular, but they are only slightly prominent. The skin is light brown dorsally, with irregular darker or whitish spots. The venter is white, lightly tinted with brown. The throat is white or greyish, with the border of the chin sometimes punctuated with white and brown. Dark spots often take the form of transversal bands on the limbs. Males have an external, sub-gular vocal sac, which is marked by a longitudinal fold near the jaw on both sides of the throat (de Witte, 1921).


Authors: Zimkus, Breda; Dietterich, Lee
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Size

According to de Witte (1924), the holotype measured 27 mm. Zimkus (unpublished) found two specimens labeled as holotypes in the RMCA, a male measuring 25.6 mm and a female measuring 27.9 mm.


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Comparisons

This species can be distinguished from its close relative Phrynobatrachus acridoides by its very accentuated canthus rostralis and its more vertical frenal region, as well as by its granular dorsal skin (de Witte 1921).


Author: Dietterich, Lee
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Population Biology

There is no information on the population status of this species, and there have been no subsequent records of it since its discovery, presumably due to a lack of herpetological work within its range (Channing, 2004).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

IUCN Red List Category and Justification of Conservation Status

The IUCN Red List (2010) categorizes this species as Data Deficient in view of the absence of recent information on its extent of occurrence, status and ecological requirements.


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Threats

There is no information on threats to this species (Channing, 2004).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Conservation Actions and Management

It has not been recorded from any protected areas (Channing, 2004).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/