AMPHIBIAWEB
Phrynobatrachus dalcqi
family: Phrynobatrachidae
Conservation Status (definitions)
IUCN (Red List) Status Data Deficient (DD)
CITES
Other International Status None
National Status None
Regional Status None

Country distribution from AmphibiaWeb's database: Congo, the Democratic Republic of the

 

View distribution map using BerkeleyMapper.

   

From the Encyclopedia of Life account:

Etymology

This species was named for Professor A. Dalcq, presumably Albert Dalcq (1893-1973) who was a Belgian embryologist (Thieffry, 2001).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Summary

Phrynobatrachus dalcqi is a large species (SVL up to 37 mm) of puddle frog, known only from Haute Lubitshako in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. Members of this genus are identified by the presence of a midtarsal tubercle, elongate inner metatarsal tubercle, and outer metatarsal tubercle. Phrynobatrachus dalcqi is characterized by moderate pedal webbing, large digital discs, and a venter that is greyish-white, stippled with a darker grey and leaving a clear median line on the throat.


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Distribution

This species is known only from Haute Lubitshako, Fizi District, southern Kivu Province, eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (Pickersgill and Drewes, 2004).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Morphology

Proportions of this species are squat. Conical papilla is present on the tongue. Head a little longer than broad. Snout obtusely pointed, beyond the mouth at the anterior, longer than the eye. Cathus rostralis is obtuse or slightly angular; loreal region is concave. Nostrils are closer to the end of snout than to the eye; interorbital space at least as large as the upper eyelid. The tympanum is distinct, measuring two-thirds to three-quarters of the eye. Digits are dilated to distinct discs; the 3rd finger is 1.5 times to 1.75 times broader at the tip compared to the base. The first finger is shorter than the 2nd, and the 2nd is slightly shorter than the 4th. The length of the 3rd finger (without the metacarpal) is 1.97 to 2.13 times the head. Toes are two-fifths webbed; one-half a phalange is free of webbing on toe I, 2 phalanges are free on toe III and V, and 3 toes free on IV. Discs on toes are smaller than those of the fingers. External metatarsal tubercle is small and round, sometimes pointed; inner metatarsal tubercle is ovular. Tarsal tubercle is more or less distinct, thorny in the male, and connected by an oblique cutaneous fold to the internal metatarsal tubercle. The tibio-tarsal articulation reaches the eye or exceeding its, but does not reach the nostril. Tibia approximately twice as long as the snout-vent length, 3.25 to 3.6 times as long as broad; sometimes the tibia is slightly shorter and sometimes slightly longer than the foot. The heels overlap when the limbs are placed at right angle with the body. Skin is moderately warty in the females and more strongly so in the males. A number of glandular folds are present: two oblique dorsolateral folds in the scapular region, a horseshoe-shaped median dorsal fold, and a supratympanic fold, similar to that observed in P. dendrobates. In the males, many minute, pointed, white asperities are present on the tarsi, the metatarsi, and under the toes; they are more abundant towards the external sides. An interal vocal sac is present in males with the gular skin folds similar to P. versicolor.

Dorsum is brownish-gray olive, very indistinctly mottled with black, and glands are slightly darker. Dark transverse bars are present on the thighs, tibiae and tarsals. A dark zone surrounding the vent is present, framed by two curved clear lines that is oblique at the base of thighs near the posterior side. A narrow vertebral band can exist (present in a juvenile of the type series). Venter is greyish-white, more or less strongly stippled with a darker grey (more in the females that in the males), leaving a clear median line on the throat and the chest that is quite distinct in juveniles and only subtle in females.


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Size

The type series includes males that exhibit snout-vent lengths of 36.1-37.1 mm (N=2) and females that range from 32.8-36.8 mm (N=3; Laurent, 1952).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Comparisons

It is most similar to those species restricted to the Albertine Rift, including P. acutirostris, P. asper, P. dendrobates, P. petropedetoides, P. sulfureogularis, and P. versicolor. This species is similar and somewhat intermediate between P. dendrobates and P. versicolor with the broad digital discs off the first, and the squat proportions of the second.


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Habitat and Ecology

It is recorded from at 1,900-2,000m asl. and is presumed to be a montane forest species (Pickersgill and Drewes, 2004).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Population Biology

There is no information on the population status of this species, and there have been no subsequent records of it since its discovery, presumably due to a lack of herpetological work within its range (Pickersgill and Drewes, 2004).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Phylogenetics

Sequence data is not currently available for this species, but it most likely falls within the group of large-bodied puddle frogs restricted to the Albertine Rift, including P. acutirostris, P. dendrobates, P. petropedetoides, and P. versicolor identified by Zimkus et al. (2010). This group is also hypothesized to include P. asper, P. irangi, and P. sulfureogularis.


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

IUCN Red List Category and Justification of Conservation Status

The IUCN Red List (2009) categorizes this species as Data Deficient in view of the absence of recent information on its extent of occurrence, status and ecological requirements (Pickersgill and Drewes, 2004).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Trends

It is assumed that populations of this species are decreasing (Pickersgill and Drewes, 2004).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Threats

There is no direct information on threats to this species (Pickersgill and Drewes, 2004).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Conservation Actions and Management

This species is not known from any protected areas (Pickersgill and Drewes, 2004).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/