AMPHIBIAWEB
Cacosternum namaquense
Namaqua dainty frog
family: Pyxicephalidae
subfamily: Cacosterninae

© 2005 Arie van der Meijden (1 of 2)

  hear Fonozoo call

Conservation Status (definitions)
IUCN (Red List) Status Least Concern (LC)
CITES
Other International Status None
National Status None
Regional Status None

Country distribution from AmphibiaWeb's database: Namibia, South Africa

 

View distribution map using BerkeleyMapper.

   

From the Encyclopedia of Life account:

Distribution

C. namaquense is found throughout Namaqualand, South Africa (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: Scott, E.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Morphology

C. namaquense is highly cryptic with blotches of beige, brown and stippled markings that break up its outline, enabling it to blend with the granite substrate (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: Scott, E.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Habitat and Ecology

C. namaquense occurs in the winter-rainfall regions of Namaqualand with Succulent Karoo vegetation. The annual precipitation is low, averaging 150–300 mm (Schulze 1997). This species shelters under stones and exfoliating granite or in cracks during the dry season, emerging in wet periods to feed and reproduce (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: Scott, E.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Associations

Males engage in territorial disputes when other males approach too closely. The only known predators are large toads (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: Scott, E.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Advertisement Call

Calling has been recorded after rains in July, August, September, October, November, March and April. Little is known of the breeding biology of this species. Males call from beneath vegetation or from exposed positions at or near the water’s edge. The advertisement call is a repeated, nasal bleat, frequently followed by a clicking territorial call. Calling is antiphonal, producing an almost continuous chorus (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: Scott, E.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Reproduction

Breeding takes place in temporary pools formed in eroded “tanks” in granitic bedrock, rocky streambeds, permanent pools and seeps, but the species has also adapted well to breeding in man-made dams, quarries and borrow-pits. Breeding is opportunistic and correlated with sparse rainfall events (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: Scott, E.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

IUCN Red List Category and Justification of Conservation Status

C. namaquense does not appear to be threatened. It is known to occur in two protected areas: the Richtersveld Contractual National Park and the Goegap Nature Reserve (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: Scott, E.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/