AMPHIBIAWEB
Phrynobatrachus petropedetoides
family: Phrynobatrachidae
Conservation Status (definitions)
IUCN (Red List) Status Data Deficient (DD)
CITES
Other International Status None
National Status None
Regional Status None

Country distribution from AmphibiaWeb's database: Congo, the Democratic Republic of the, Tanzania, United Republic of, Uganda

 

View distribution map using BerkeleyMapper.

   

From the Encyclopedia of Life account:

Etymology

This species is presumably named for the sub-Saharan frog genus Petropedetes.


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Taxonomic Notes

A study by Zimkus et al. (2010) supports the identification of P. petropedetoides as a distinct species, following Laurent (1972), and not a synonym of P. dendrobates (Drewes and Vindum, 1994; Vonesh, 2001).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Summary

Phrynobatrachus petropedetoides is a large species (SVL < 40 mm) of puddle frog from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, and Tanzania. Members of this genus are identified by the presence of a midtarsal tubercle, elongate inner metatarsal tubercle, and outer metatarsal tubercle. Phrynobatrachus petropedetoides is characterized by


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Distribution

Montane forests of eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, southwestern Uganda, and extreme western Tanzania (Frost, 2010).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Morphology

The head is as long as it is broad. A small conical papilla is present in the middle of the tongue. Canthus rostralis is distinct; the loreal renal region is rather steep and somewhat concave. The nostril is slightly closer to the tip of snout than to the eye. Interorbital space is broader than upper eyelid. Tympanum is distinct, measuring 3/5-2/3 the diameter of the eye. The snout is 1/2-3/4 the diameter of the eye. Fingers are dilated at their ends into distinct discs. The first finger is shorter than the second, and finger III is longer than the snout. The sub-articular tubercles are somewhat weak. The tibiotarsal articulation reaches between the rear border of the eye and the nostril when the hind limb is extended. The heels overlap when the limbs are bent at right angles to the body. Webbing is moderate with toes 1/3 webbed, with broad web reaching only the proximal sub-articular tubercle on toes III-V. A small, ovular internal metatarsal tubercles and small, round external metatarsal tubercle are present. The small tarsal tubercle is somewhat hardly visible, and it is as far from the inner metatarsal tubercle as the inner is from the outer metatarsal tubercle. The SVL is 2.2-2.5 times the femur length. The femur is shorter than the tibia. The tibia is 2.75-3.5 times longer than broad. The SVL is 2.75-4.5 times tibia length. The tibia is approximately the same length as the foot. The dorsum is covered with many warts arranged in longitudinal rows. Prominent glands are present in the scapular region. The venter is smooth. Males exhibit shallow, lateral gular folds, nuptials pads on manual digit I, and spines on the venter of the foot, including the inner sides of digits I-V, the outer side of digit V, and between metatarsal V and the outer metatarsal tubercle.

The dorsum is brownish grey with lighter patches, and there is often a darker band present between the eyes. Some specimens may exhibit a vertebral line.The upper jaw is black and white. The venter is white and marbled with darkish brown. The throat is darker than rest of venter. The limbs are banded.


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Size

The SVL of the holotype measures 38 mm (Ahl, 1924). Zimkus (unpublished) examined specimens from 26.4 to 40.0 mm.


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Comparisons

It is most similar to those large species restricted to the Albertine Rift and East Africa, including P. acutirostris, P. asper, P. dalcqui, P. dendrobates, P. krefftii, P. petropedetoides, and P. sulfureogularis. This species is distinguished from P. versicolor by its slim aspect, longer tibia, longer fingers and more developed digits. P. petropedetoides has a blunter snount when compared to P. dendrobates, and males exhibit minute spines only on the feet, whereas the latter exhibits these minute spinules on the dorsal and lateral surfaces of the body.


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Phylogenetics

Mitochodrial sequence data from 12S rRNA, valine-tRNA, and 16S rRNA fragment, as well as combined sequence data from mitochondrial and nuclear (RAG-1) genes indicate that P. petropedetoides is the sister species of P. versicolor, and these species are in turn sister to other large-bodies puddle frogs from the Albertine Rift, including P. acutirostris and P. dendrobates (Zimkus, 2010). This group is also hypothesized to include P. dalcqui, P. irangi, and P. sulfureogularis, and in turn is sister to P. krefftii from East Africa.


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

IUCN Red List Category and Justification of Conservation Status

Phrynobatrachus petropedetoides is not currently included in the IUCN's Red List assessment of amphibian species because they follow Drewes and Vindum (1994) and Vonesh (2001) in considering P. petropedetoides to be a synonym of P. dendrobates.


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/