AMPHIBIAWEB
Afrixalus leucostictus
family: Hyperoliidae

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Conservation Status (definitions)
IUCN (Red List) Status Least Concern (LC)
See IUCN account.
CITES No CITES Listing
Other International Status None
National Status None
Regional Status None

   

Description
A large (Males 27–32 mm, females 25–36 mm) forest form from R. D. Congo characterised by a less contrasting pattern than in A. equatorialis and especially by its lack of tibial pattern. Dorsum with minute white spots. The separation of A. leucostictus from equatorialis, the other large forest species in the area, is not well understood. The two forms are generally allopatric and could be regarded as subspecies, but Laurent has reported the occurrence of both species at Sankuru. Although there is considerable overlapping, the snout in A. leucostictus is generally shorter relative to the eye, and second toe is shorter relative to tibia. Ventrum in life greyish or violet, not yellowish as in A. osorioi. The gular disc, however, may be yellowish. The dorsal pattern may have quite contrasting colours, but can also be quite uniform with no visible pattern, according to Laurent. Since contrast in pattern in Afrixalus depends very much on light and humidity, and contrast in preserved specimens on the conditions when they were preserved, one can doubt the validity of this as a diagnostic character for the species.

Distribution and Habitat

Country distribution from AmphibiaWeb's database: Congo, the Democratic Republic of the

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According to Laurent (1972), found in dense forest connected with stagnant water mainly at attitudes between 750 and 1000 m in eastern R. D. Congo.

Comments
This account was taken from "Treefrogs of Africa" by Arne Schiøtz with kind permission from Edition Chimaira publishers, Frankfurt am Main.

References
 

Laurent, R.F. (1972). ''Amphibiens. Exploration du Parc National des Virunga.'' Deuxieme Série, Fascicule, 22, 1-125.  

Schiøtz, A. (1999). Treefrogs of Africa. Edition Chimaira, Frankfurt am Main.



Written by Arne Schiøtz (arne AT schiotz.dk), *
First submitted 2000-12-25
Edited by Arie van der Meijden (2008-09-09)



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Citation: AmphibiaWeb: Information on amphibian biology and conservation. [web application]. 2014. Berkeley, California: AmphibiaWeb. Available: http://amphibiaweb.org/. (Accessed: Nov 21, 2014).

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