AMPHIBIAWEB
This reference list is compiled by Professor Tim Halliday (formerly DAPTF International Director) (tim.r.halliday@gmail.com). It lists papers on amphibian declines and their causes and papers on amphibian conservation, with an emphasis on those that describe methods for monitoring and conserving amphibian populations. Tim is always delighted to receive details of forthcoming papers from their authors.

February 2015

Anderson, T. L.  et al.  (2015)  Abundance and phenology patterns of two pond-breeding salamanders determine species interactions in natural populations.  Oecologia:  177;  761-773.
(tlarkf@missouri.edu)

Bales, E. K. et al.  (2015)  Pathogenic chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, but not B. salamandrivorans, detected on eastern hellbenders.  PLoS One:  10 (2);  e0116405.
(terrellk@si.edu)

Benard, M. F.  (2015)  Warmer winters reduce frog fecundity and shift breeding phenology, which consequently alters larval development and metamorphic timing.  Global Change Biology:  21;  1058-1065.
(mfb38@case.edu)

Bletz, M. C. et al.  (2015)  Differential efficiency among DNA extraction methods influence detection of the amphibian pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis.  Diseases of Aquatic Organisms:  113;  1-8.
(molly.bletz@gmail.com)

Bletz, M. C. et al.  (2015)  Widespread presence of the pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in wild amphibian communities in Madagascar.  Scientific Reports:  5;  Article No. 8633.
(molly.bletz@gmail.com)

Bresciano, J. C. et al.  (in press)  Variations in the presence of anti-Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis bacteria of amphibians across life stages and elevations in Ecuador.  EcoHealth:
(jorgebresciano@gmail.com)

Clauzel, C. et al.  (2015)  Integrating regional-scale connectivity in habitat restoration:  an application for amphibian conservation in eastern France.  J. Nature Conservation:  23;  98-107.
(celine.clauzel@univ-fcomte.fr)

Connette, G. M. et al.  (in press)  Climate change and shrinking salamanders:  alternative mechanisms for changes in plethodontid salamander body size.  Global Change Biology: 
(grmcco@gmail.com)

Ficetola, G. F. et al.  (2015)  Habitat availability for amphibians and extinction threat:  a global analysis.  Diversity & Distributions:  21;  302-311.
(francesco.ficetola@gmail.com)

Flynn, R. W. et al.  (2015)  Lethal and sublethal measures of chronic copper toxicity in the eastern narrowmouth toad, Gastrophryne carolinensis.  Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry:  34;  575-582.
(wflynn@srel.uga.edu)

Hegan, A. E.  (2014)  Alien herpetofauna pathways, invasions, current management practices and control method ethics:  a review of some significant problems in the USA.  Herpetological Bulletin:  129;  3-14.
(allisonhegan@gmail.com)

Jerrett, I. V. et al.  (in press)  Pathology of a bohle-like virus infection in two Australian frog species (Litoria splendida and Litoria caerulea).  J. Comparative Pathology:
(ian.jerrett@depi.vic.gov.au)

Kohl, K. D. et al.  (in press)  Larval exposure to polychlorinated biphenyl 126 (PCB-126) causes persistent alteration of the amphibian gut microbiota.  Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry:
(kevin.kohl@utah.edu)

Liendro, N. et al.  (in press)  Toxicity of the insecticide chlorpyrifos to the South American toad Rhinella arenarum at larval developmental stage.  Environmental Toxicology & Pharmacology:  39;  525-535.
(a.venturino@conicet.gov.ar)

Maddock, S. T. et al.  (2014)  Non-lethal DNA sampling for caecilian amphibians.  British J. Herpetology:  24;  255-260.
(d.gower@nhm.ac.uk)

Mathieu-Denoncourt, J. et al.  (in press)  Chronic exposures to monomethyl phthalate in western clawed frogs.  General & Comparative Endocrinology:
(valerie.langlois@rmc.ca)

Moore, J.-D. & Ouellet, M.  (2015)  Questioning the use of an amphibian colour morph as an indicator of climate change.  Global Change Biology:  21;  566-571.
(david.moore@mffp.gouv.qc.ca)

Nowakowski, A. J. et al.  (2015)  Mechanistic insights into landscape genetic structure of two tropical amphibians using field-derived resistance surfaces.  Molecular Ecology:  24;  580-595.
(nowakowskia@gmail.com)

O’Brien, C. D. et al.  (2015)  Extending the natural range of a declining species:  genetic evidence for native great crested newt (Triturus cristatus) populations in the Scottish highlands.  European Journal of Wildlife Research:  61;  27-33.
(r.jehle@salford.ac.uk)

Quilodrán, C. S. et al.  (2015)  Modelling interspecific hybridization with genome exclusion to identify conservation choices:  the case of native and invasive Pelophylax waterfrogs.  Evolutionary Applications:  8;  199-210.
(juan.montoya@unige.ch)

Rantala, H. M. et al.  (2015)  Long-term changes in structure and function of a tropical headwater stream following a disease-driven amphibian decline.  Freshwater Biology:  60;  575-589.
(rantala@siu.edu)

Rohr, J. R. et al.  (in press)  Predator diversity, intraguild predation, and indirect effects drive parasite transmission.  PNAS:
(jasonrohr@gmail.com)

Rollins-Smith, L. A. et al.  (2015)  Coqui frogs persist with the deadly chytrid fungus despite a lack of defensive antimicrobial peptides.  Diseases of Aquatic Organisms:  113;  81-83.
(pburrowesupr@gmail.com)

Sai, L. et al.  (2015)  Assessing atrazine-induced toxicities in Bufo bufo gargarizans Cantor.  Bulletin of Environmental Contamination & Toxicology:  94;  152-157.
(ganaon@163.com)

Santana, F. E. et al.  (2015)  Chilled frogs are hot:  hibernation and reproduction of the endangered mountain yellow-legged frog Rana muscosa.  Endangered Species Research:  27;  43-51.
(rswaisgood@sandiegozoo.org)

Sparling, D. W. et al.  (2015)  In situ effects of pesticides on amphibians in the Sierra Nevada.  Ecotoxicology:  24;  262-278.
(dcowman@brazosvalleymuseum.org)

Spear, S. F. et al.  (2015)  Using environmental DNA methods to improve detectability in a hellbender (Cryptobranchus alleganiensis) monitoring program.  Biological Conservation:  183;  38-45.
(sspear@oriannesociety.org)

Stockwell, M. P. et al.  (2015)  Evidence of a salt refuge:  chytrid infection loads are suppressed in hosts exposed to salt.  Oecologia:  177;  901-910.
(michelle.stockwell@newcastle.edu.au))

Stöhr, A. C. et al.  (2015)  Phylogeny and differentiation of reptilian and amphibian ranaviruses detected in Europe.  PLoS One:  10 (2);  e0118633.
(rachel.marschang@gmail.com))

Tapley, B. et al.  (2015)  Meeting ultraviolet B radiation requirements of amphibians in captivity:  a case study with mountain chicken frogs (Leptodactylus fallax) and general recommendation for pre-release health screening.  Zoo Biology:  34;  46-52.
(ben.tapley@zsl.org)

Tapley, B. et al.  (2014)  Towards evidence-based husbandry for caecilian amphibians:  substrate preference in Geotrypetes seraphini (Amphibia:  Gymnophoniona:  Dermophiidae).  Herpetological Bulletin:  129;  15-18.
(ben.tapley@zsl.org)

Tompsett, A. R. et al.  (2015)  Transcriptional changes in African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis) exposed to 17a-ethynylestradiol during early development.  Ecotoxicology:  24;  321-329.
(markus.hecker@usask.ca)

Wagner, N. et al.  (in press)  Acute toxic effects of the herbicide formulation and the active ingredient used in cycloxydim-tolerant maize cultivation on embryos and larvae of the African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis.  Bulletin of Environmental Contamination & Toxicology:
(wagnern@uni-trier.de)

Wood, L. & Welch, A. M.  (2015)  Assessment of interactive effects of elevated salinity and three pesticides on life history and behaviour of southern toad (Anaxyrus terrestris) tadpoles.  Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry:  34;  667-676.
(welcha@cofc.edu)

Yu, S. et al.  (2015)  Interactive effects of ultraviolet-B radiation and pesticide exposure on DNA photo-adduct accumulation and expression of DNA damage and repair genes in Xenopus laevis embryos.  Aquatic Toxicology:  159;  256-266.
(shuangying.yu@ttu.edu)

Zongo, B. & Boussim, J. I.  (2015)  The effects of physicochemical variables and tadpole assemblages on microalgal communities in freshwater temporary ponds through an experimental approach.  Aquatic Biosystems:  11;  eCollection 2015.
(azongo@hotmail.fr)