AMPHIBIAWEB
This reference list is compiled by Professor Tim Halliday (formerly DAPTF International Director) (tim.r.halliday@gmail.com). It lists papers on amphibian declines and their causes and papers on amphibian conservation, with an emphasis on those that describe methods for monitoring and conserving amphibian populations. Tim is always delighted to receive details of forthcoming papers from their authors.

April 2015

Antwis, R. E. et al.  (in press)  Amphibian symbiotic bacteria do not show universal ability to inhibit growth of the global pandemic lineage of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis.  Applied & Environmental Microbiology:
(rachael.antwis@gmail.com)

Babini, M. S. et al.  (2015)  Health status of tadpoles and metamorphs of Rhinella arenarum (Anura, Bufonidae) that inhabit agroecosystems and its implications for land use.  Ecotoxicology & Environmental Safety:  118;  118-125.
(sbabini@exa.unrc.edu.ar)

Beebee, T.  (2015)  The great crested newt:  an ongoing conservation dilemma.  British Wildlife:  26;  230-236.
(t.j.c.beebee@sussex.ac.uk)

Botts, E. A. et al.  (2015)  Observed range dynamics of South African amphibians under conditions of climate change.  Austral Ecology:  40;  309-317.
(graham.alexander@wits.ac.za)

Courtois, E. A. et al.  (2015)  Widespread occurrence of Bd in French Guiana, South America.  PLoS One:  10 (4);  e0125128.
(courtoiselodie@gmail.com)

Dufresnes, C. & Perrin, N.  (in press)  Effect of biogeographic history on population vulnerability in European amphibians.  Conservation Biology: 
(christophe.dufresnes@unil.ch)

Franca, F. M. et al.  (2015)  Acute toxicity and ecotoxicological risk assessment of rice pesticides to Lithobates catesbeianus tadpoles.  J. Environmental Science & Health B:  50;  406-410.
(fernanda_raniculture@yahoo.com.br)

Gabor, C. R. et al.  (2015)  Elevated corticosterone levels and changes in amphibian behavior are associated with Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) infection and Bd lineage.  PLoS One:  10 (4);  e0122685.
(matthew.fisher@imperial.ac.uk)

Gómez, A. V. et al.  (2015)  Absence of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in eighteen species of amphibians from a variety of habitats in Tamaulipas, Mexico.  Herpetological Review:  46;  34-37.
(a_v118@txstate.edu)

Hanlon, S. M. et al.  (in press)  The effects of a fungicide and chytrid fungus on anuran larvae in aquatic mesocosms.  Environmental Science & Pollution Research:
(shane.michael.hanlon@gmail.com)

Labisko, J. et al.  (2015)  Chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis) undetected in the two orders of Seychelles amphibians.  Herpetological Review:  46;  41-45.
(jl412@kent.ac.uk)

Han, B. A. et al.  (2015)  Host species composition influences infection severity among amphibians in the absence of spillover transmission.  Ecology & Evolution:  5;  1432-1439.
(hanb@caryinstitute.org)

Kohl, K. D. et al.  (2015)  Larval exposure to polychlorinated biphenyl 126 (PCB-126) causes persistent alteration of the amphibian gut microbiota.  Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry:  34;  1113-1118.
(kevin.kohl@utah.edu)

Mardirosian, M. N. et al.  (2015)  Acute toxicity of arsenic and oxidative stress responses in the embryonic development of the common South American toad Rhinella arenarumEnvironmental Toxicology & Chemistry:  34;  1009-1014.
(aventu1@yahoo.com.ar)

Moriguchi, S. et al.  (2015)  Predicting the potential distribution of the amphibian pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in East and Southeast Asia.  Diseases of Aquatic Organisms:  113;  177-185.
(rustica79@yahoo.co.jp)

Nordick, A. W. et al.  (2015)  Using digital photographs and pattern recognition to identify individual boreal toads (Anaxyrus boreas boreas).  Herpetological Review:  46;  18-22.
(kevin.thompson@state.co.us)

Peralta-García, A. et al.  (2014)  African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) in Baja California:  a confirmed population and possible ongoing invasion in Mexican watersheds.  Southwestern Naturalist:  59;  431-434.
(annyperaltagarcia@yahoo.com.mx)

Pilliod, D. S. & Scherer, R. D.  (2015)  Managing habitat to slow or reverse population declines of the Columbia spotted frog in the northern Great Basin.  J. Wildlife Management:  79;  579-590.
(dpilliod@usgs.gov)

Ringler, M. et al.  (2015)  Populations, pools, and peccaries:  simulating the impact of ecosystem engineers on rainforest frogs.  Behavioral Ecology:  26;  340-349.
(max.ringler@univie.ac.at)

Semlitsch, R. D. et al.  (2015)  Intermediate pond sizes contain the highest density, richness, and diversity of pond-breeding amphibians.  PLoS One:  10 (4);  e0123055.
(semlitschr@missouri.edu)

Sotomayor, V. et al.  (2015)  Biochemical biomarkers of sublethal effects in Rhinella arenarum late gastrula exposed to the organophosphate chlorpyrifos.  Pesticide Biochemistry & Physiology:  119;  48-53.
(a.venturino@conicet.gov.ar)

Van Teeffelen, A. J. A. et al.  (2015)  Is green infrastructure an effective climate adaptation strategy for conserving biodiversity?  A case study with the great crested newt.  Landscape Ecology:  30;  937-954.
(astrid.van.teeffelen@vu.nl)

Wilson, T. P. et al.  (2015)  Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis prevalence in two ranid frogs on a former United States Department of Defense installation in southeastern Tennessee.  Herpetological Review:  46;  37-41.
(thomas-wilson@utc.edu)

Wolff, S. E. et al.  (in press)  Estrogenic environmental contaminants alter the mRNA abundance profiles of genes involved in gonadal differentiation of the American bullfrog.  Science of the Total Environment: 
(catherine.propper@nau.edu)