AMPHIBIAWEB
Telmatobius dankoi
family: Telmatobiidae
Conservation Status (definitions)
IUCN (Red List) Status Critically Endangered (CR)
CITES
Other International Status None
National Status None
Regional Status None

Country distribution from AmphibiaWeb's database: Chile

 

View distribution map using BerkeleyMapper.

   

From the IUCN Red List Species Account:

 

Range Description

This species is known only from the type locality, Las Cascadas, along the Loa River, in El Loa Province, Chile on the western slopes of the Andes. It can be found up to 2,260 m asl, and probably occurs elsewhere in the tributaries of the Loa River. Its extent of occurrence and area of occupancy are 10 km2.

Habitat and Ecology

It lives in a montane river in a high desert and has large free-swimming larvae.

Population

The species is not abundant and the population is suspected to be decreasing.

Population Trend

decreasing

Major Threats

The major threat to this species is water pollution caused by mining activities. Abstraction of surface water for human consumption and agriculture, as well as recreational activities, are affecting it.

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
It does not occur in any protected area.

Conservation Needed
Inclusion in the national legislation is needed.

Red List Status

Critically Endangered (CR)

Rationale

Listed as Critically Endangered because its extent of occurrence and area of occupancy are 10 km2, and it is known from a single, small location heavily affected by different impacts that are reducing habitat quality and quantity, including seepage from mining, recreational activities and abstraction of surface water. In addition, the species does not occur in any protected area.

Taxonomic Notes

The species may be a synonym of T. vilamensis (Sáez et al., 2014).

Citation

IUCN SSC Amphibian Specialist Group 2015. Telmatobius dankoi. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2015: e.T57335A79813594. http://dx.doi.org/10.2305/IUCN.UK.2015-4.RLTS.T57335A79813594.en .Downloaded on 20 November 2018

 

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