AMPHIBIAWEB
Scaphiopus hurterii
Hurter's Spadefoot
family: Scaphiopodidae

© 2007 Stanley Trauth (1 of 1)

Country distribution from AmphibiaWeb's database: United States

View distribution map using BerkeleyMapper.


Conservation Status (definitions)
IUCN (Red List) Status Least Concern (LC)
See IUCN account.
NatureServe Status Use NatureServe Explorer to see status.
CITES No CITES Listing
Other International Status None
National Status None
Regional Status None

   

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bookcover The following account is modified from Amphibian Declines: The Conservation Status of United States Species, edited by Michael Lannoo (©2005 by the Regents of the University of California), used with permission of University of California Press. The book is available from UC Press.

Scaphiopus hurterii Strecker, 1910
            Hurter's Spadefoot

            Editor's note: While we follow Crother et al. (2000) and consider Hurter's spadefoot toads (Scaphiopus hurterii) to be a distinct species, they historically have been considered a subspecies of eastern spadefoot toads (Scaphiopus holbrookii).  The range of Hurter's spadefoot toads is from eastern extensions in central Louisiana west to the Balcones Escarpment of the Edwards Plateau, and from northern populations in eastern Oklahoma and western Arkansas south to the Rio Grande (Wasserman, 1968).  The Mississippi River generally separates Hurter's spadefoot toads from eastern spadefoot toads, however, populations of eastern spadefoot toads occur west of the Mississippi River in Arkansas and Missouri.  Hurter's spadefoot toads and eastern spadefoot toads will interbreed (Wasserman, 1957, 1958), and because most aspects of their ecology are similar, features of their life history and natural history are covered under the Scaphiopus holbrookii account (Palis, this volume).  There is at least one noted difference between these species—Hurter's spadefoot toad tadpoles readily take live invertebrate prey, including mosquito (dipteran) larvae and fairy shrimp (Anostraca; Bragg, 1962b).



Literature references for Amphibian Declines: The Conservation Status of United States Species, edited by Michael Lannoo, are here.

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Citation: AmphibiaWeb: Information on amphibian biology and conservation. [web application]. 2014. Berkeley, California: AmphibiaWeb. Available: http://amphibiaweb.org/. (Accessed: Oct 24, 2014).

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