AMPHIBIAWEB
Capensibufo rosei
Rose's Toad
family: Bufonidae

Country distribution from AmphibiaWeb's database: South Africa

View distribution map using BerkeleyMapper.


Conservation Status (definitions)
IUCN (Red List) Status Vulnerable (VU)
See IUCN account.
CITES
Other International Status None
National Status None
Regional Status None

   

From the Encyclopedia of Life account:

Distribution

C. rosei is endemic to the winter-rainfall region of Western Cape Province in South Africa (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: de Villiers, A.L.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Morphology

The dorsum is smooth and soft with scattered blister-like ridges and warts on the back and sides, while the posterior region of the ventrum has heavily granulated skin. The parotoid glands are distinct and have an inverted pear shape (when viewed from the rear). There is no webbing between the toes and the hind limbs are relatively short and better adapted for walking and running than for jumping (Poynton 1964; Wager 1965). Power and Rose (1929) explain that during the breeding season a bright pink, oval patch appears below the vent in both sexes (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).

C. rosei body is shaded in a variety of colours from grey to brown; there are also several light coloured bands present. Red and orange colouring are found on the parotoid glands. The underside of the frog is white with dark markings (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: de Villiers, A.L.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Size

Males reach 28 mm and females reach 39 mm in length (Channing 2001).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Diagnostic Description

C. rosei is a small toad with an elongate body and females that are much larger than males.


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Comparisons

C. rosei cannot be confused with any other toad in its distribution range. The only other member of the genus is the allopatric species, C. tradouwi which, unlike C. rosei, has a tympanum and produces an advertisement call (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: de Villiers, A.L.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Habitat and Ecology

The areas in which this species occurs receive 600–3000 mm rain per annum. The localities vary in altitude from 60 m on the southern Cape Peninsula, to 1600 m, although >80% of localities are above 400 m. C. rosei has a geographically fragmented distribution pattern that, based on current knowledge. This toad is restricted to mountains where it occurs in undisturbed Mountain Fynbos of the Fynbos Biome. Although it is usually associated with the generally flatter topography on mountain tops recorded from low-lying plateaus on the southern Cape Peninsula (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: de Villiers, A.L.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Metamorphosis

The embryos take up to 12 days to leave the egg capsules. Metamorphosis takes about six weeks, depending on temperature and the availability of food and water (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: de Villiers, A.L.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Advertisement Call

C. rosei lacks an advertisement call (Poynton 1964; Wager 1965). This species might be the only southern African amphibian that lacks a voice (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: de Villiers, A.L.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Reproduction

The commencement of breeding is dependent on rainfall and the formation of small, shallow pools of water during the winter rainy season. The species is not known to breed in pools of moving water associated with mountain streams (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: de Villiers, A.L.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Tadpole morphology

The tadpoles are dark in colour and attain a length of about 21 mm, of which more than half comprises the tail. The tiny toads are about 6.25 mm in length when they leave the water (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: de Villiers, A.L.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

IUCN Red List Category and Justification of Conservation Status

C. rosei was previously listed as Restricted (Branch 1988) and is presently listed as Vulnerable (Harrison et al. 2001). The species has a restricted and fragmented distribution (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: de Villiers,A.L.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/