AMPHIBIAWEB
Noblella heyeri
family: Strabomantidae
subfamily: Holoadeninae

View distribution map using BerkeleyMapper.


Conservation Status (definitions)
IUCN (Red List) Status Data Deficient (DD)
See IUCN account.
CITES No CITES Listing
Other International Status None
National Status None
Regional Status None

   

Description
Phyllonastes heyeri, originally described as Phrynopus heyeri (Lynch, 1986), is a diminutive frog from Peru and Ecuador with many morphological features in common with Adelophryne adiastola (Lynch, 1986). De la Riva and Köhler (1998; Journal of Herpetology 32:328-329) suggested that the Phrynopus peruvianus group is likely paraphyletic with respect to Phyllonastes. Adults males are small, 12.9-14.1 mm SVL, females 13.1-15.9 SVL. Very low warts are present o nthe skin of the dorsum and appears to be pitted or “dimpled.” Skin of venter pitted. In preservative, dorsum is pale reddish-brown with brown interorbital bar, scapular and sacral chevrons, and suprainguinal spots; anal patch is brown; posterior surfaces of thighs cream speckled with brown; faint bars on shanks; brown on side of head – continuing as dark brown band onto flanks. Forelimbs partially banded. Head is narrower than body, slightly wider than long; tip of snout extends farther anteriorly than anterior edge of upper jaw. Loreal region slopes abruptly to lips; supratympanic fold thick, glandular, and not prominent. The tympanum is concealed partially or entirely beneath the skin, separated from eye by distance equal to 66% tympanum length. No vomerine odontophores or teeth. Forearm lacks ulnar tubercles; one palmar tubercle present and is larger than over thenar tubercle. Supernumerary palmar tubercles present at the bases of fingers II-IV. No discs or fringes on fingers. Two metatarsal tubercles, both prominent and subconical, inner slightly larger and slightly longer than wide; toes lack lateral fringes and webbing.

Distribution and Habitat

Country distribution from AmphibiaWeb's database: Ecuador, Peru

View distribution map using BerkeleyMapper.
Known from SW Huancabamba, Departamento Piura, Peru at 3100 m and Alamor, Provincia Loja, Ecuador.

Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors
Presumably leaf litter dwellers.

Possible reasons for amphibian decline

General habitat alteration and loss

References
 

Lynch, J. D. (1986). ''New species of minute leptodactylid frogs from the Andes of Ecuador and Peru.'' Journal of Herpetology , 20(3), 423-431.



Written by Raul E. Diaz (lissamphibia AT gmail.com), AWeb Team
First submitted 2004-08-27
Edited by Tate Tunstall (2004-09-01)



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Citation: AmphibiaWeb: Information on amphibian biology and conservation. [web application]. 2014. Berkeley, California: AmphibiaWeb. Available: http://amphibiaweb.org/. (Accessed: Sep 1, 2014).

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