AMPHIBIAWEB
Aromobates nocturnus
Venezuelean Skunk Frog
family: Dendrobatidae

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Conservation Status (definitions)
IUCN (Red List) Status Critically Endangered (CR)
See IUCN account.
CITES No CITES Listing
Other International Status None
National Status None
Regional Status None

   

Description
Aromobates nocturnus is a relatively large aromobatid, with females reaching 62 mm. This frog can be identified mainly by the noxious substance that they secrete, which gives off odor similar to a skunk. This noxious odor acts as a defense against predation. Dorsally this frog is green, with yellow dots present in a straight line above the belly. The hind feet are webbed (Caldwell and Summers 2003).

Distribution and Habitat

Country distribution from AmphibiaWeb's database: Venezuela

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This species is known only from a single locality in northwestern Venezuela. It inhabits an area with small streams and rivulets in thick Andean cloud forest, at 2250 m above sea level (Caldwell and Summers 2003).

Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors
Aromobates nocturnus is both nocturnal and aquatic. This frog has been found only in streams, sitting or swimming in the water. The diet is thought to consist of small insects and arthropods. No information has yet been collected on the calls or reproductive aspects of this species. The common name derives from the noxious odor produced by this frog when it is handled, similar to the odor of a skunk. The skin secretion which emits the odor is neither toxic nor an alkaloid (Caldwell and Summers 2003).

Comments
This species was first described by Myers et al.(1991). Phylogenetically, it is one of the most basal members of the poison frog family Aromobatidae. Aromobates nocturnus is the only known nocturnal aromobatid (all others are diurnal), and the only known aquatic aromobatid (all others are terrestrial).

References
 

Caldwell, J. P., and Summers, K. D. (2003). ''Venezuelan skunk frog, Aromobates nocturnus.'' Grzimek's Animal Life Encyclopedia, Volume 6, Amphibians. 2nd edition. M. Hutchins, W. E. Duellman, and N. Schlager, eds., Gale Group, Farmington Hills, Michigan.  

Myers, C. W., Alfredo, P. O., and Daly, J. W. (1991). ''Discovery of a malodorous and nocturnal frog in the family Dendrobatidae: phylogenetic significance of a new genus and species from the Venezuelan Andes.'' American Museum Novitates, 3002, 1-20.



Written by Peera Chantasirivisal (Kris818 AT berkeley.edu), UC Berkeley URAP
First submitted 2005-11-09
Edited by Kellie Whittaker (2008-01-18)



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Citation: AmphibiaWeb: Information on amphibian biology and conservation. [web application]. 2014. Berkeley, California: AmphibiaWeb. Available: http://amphibiaweb.org/. (Accessed: Oct 1, 2014).

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