AMPHIBIAWEB
Osteocephalus taurinus
family: Hylidae
subfamily: Hylinae

© 2010 AndrÚs Acosta (1 of 30)

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Conservation Status (definitions)
IUCN (Red List) Status Least Concern (LC)
See IUCN account.
CITES No CITES Listing
Other International Status None
National Status None
Regional Status None

   

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Source credit:
Guia de Sapos da Reserva Adolpho Ducke, Amazonia Central by Lima et al. 2005


INPA (Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amaz├┤nia)
PPBio (Programa de Pesquisa em Biodiversidade)
PELD (Pesquisas Ecol├│gicas de Longa Dura├ž├úo)

Description
Males 71-92 mm, females 90-101 mm. The dorsum is smooth in females and granular in males. Dorsal coloration is light to dark brown, and some individuals have a light brown line in the center of the dorsum. The thighs have transverse dark brown bars. The iris is golden with black reticulations. Males have a vocal sac on each side of the head. The belly is cream to whitish.

Distribution and Habitat

Country distribution from AmphibiaWeb's database: Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Peru, Venezuela

View distribution map using BerkeleyMapper.
Common throughout the Reserva Florestal Adolpho Ducke in Brazil.

Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors
The species is arboreal and nocturnal, and is found in primary and secondary forests, usually on trunks and branches. Males call, often in groups, from low vegetation or immersed in small water bodies. Reproduction occurs throughout the year, after heavy rain, but most frequently at the start of the rainy season. The clutches contain about 2000 black eggs that are deposited as a film on the surface of temporary ponds. The tadpoles are voracious predators of eggs of their own and other species,

Comments
Male Osteocephalus oophagus differ by having a single vocal sac, and smaller size. Some individuals of O. oophagus also have numerous white spots on the sides of the body.



Written by Albertina P. Lima, William E. Magnusson, Marcelo Menin, Luciana K. Erdtmann, Domingos J. Rodrigues, Claudia Keller, Walter H├Âdl (bill AT inpa.gov.br), Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amaz├┤nia
First submitted 2007-11-21
Edited by Kellie Whittaker (2009-06-16)



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Citation: AmphibiaWeb: Information on amphibian biology and conservation. [web application]. 2014. Berkeley, California: AmphibiaWeb. Available: http://amphibiaweb.org/. (Accessed: Oct 1, 2014).

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