AMPHIBIAWEB
Petropedetes euskircheni
family: Petropedetidae
 
Species Description: Barej MF, Rodel M-O, Gonwouo LN, Pauwels OSG, Bohme W, Schmitz A. 2010. Review of the genus Petropedetes Reichenow, 1974 in Central Africa with the description of three new species (Amphibia: Anura: Petropedetidae). Zootaxa 2340:1-49

© 2013 Daniel Portik (1 of 5)
Conservation Status (definitions)
IUCN (Red List) Status
CITES
Other International Status None
National Status None
Regional Status None

Country distribution from AmphibiaWeb's database: Cameroon

 

View distribution map using BerkeleyMapper.

   

From the Encyclopedia of Life account:

Etymology

This species was named after Dipl.-Biol. Oliver Euskirchen, who accompanied A. Schmitz during fieldwork in 1997-1998.


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Distribution

This species is only known with certainty from Mt. Kupe and Mt. Nlonako (Barej et al., 2010).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Morphology

This is a large-sized Petropedetes with a robust body. The mean head width in males is 40% of the SUL, in females it is 39%. Snout in lateral view is generally rounded and obtuse. Canthus rostralis is distinct but slightly rounded; loreal region is concave. Eye diameter is approximately 1.5 times the eye-nose distance. The nose is closer to the snout tip than to the eye. The tympanum is distinct and usually flattened on upper and lower border of tympanum (tympanum / eye in males: 0.97–1.19, in females: 0.49–0.85). The tympanum is surrounded by minuscule white warts. The tympanic papilla is broad and fleshy with oval basis and is located close to upper border of tympanum papilla. The supratympanic fold is distinct. Fingers are slender, generally with T-shaped fingertips. Relative length of fingers is as follows: III > IV > II > I. Manual subarticular tubercles are single. Manual webbing is absent. Palmar tubercle and thenar tubercle are present. Males exhibit strongly developed forearm hypertrophy, a carpal spike, spinosities on the throat, upper lips and forearms, and fewer spinosities on dorsolateral parts of flanks. Larger warts are found on the flanks, and larger longitudinal warts present are on dorsum, in some specimens arranged in lines. The ventral skin is smooth. Mean femur length in males is 51% of SUL, in females about 53%. Mean tibia length in males is 60% of SUL, in females about 62%. Mean foot length in males is 80% of SUL, in females 82%. The upper hind limbs are moderately slender. The lower hind limbs have very small femoral glands (smallest in genus), of similar size in both sexes (femoral gland / femur in males: 0.12–0.21, in females: 0.10–0.16). Relative length of toes is as follows: IV > III > V > II > I. Webbing is rudimentary: 1 (1) 2 (1-1) 3 (2-2) 4 (3-3) 5 (2) (Barej et al. 2010).

Dorsum is brown-black or almost uniformly marbled brown-olive. A thin white band is present between eyes, partly proceeded posteriorly by broader dark band. The femora have dark spots, divided by thin pale lines; the lines continue on the lower legs. Venter is whitish. Femoral glands are coloured pale orange or brown, as hind legs. In preservative, the dorsum is uniform, mainly blackish-grey, and the belly is whitish with minuscule spots (less dense than in other species). The throat is dark or whitish with darker pigments in males, of same colour as belly or slightly darker pigmented in females (Barej et al. 2010).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Size

Males are generally larger than females (SUL in males: 44.3–62.0 mm, in females: 38.6–57.3 mm; Barej et al., 2010). This is the second largest species of the genus.


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Diagnostic Description

This is a large-sized Petropedetes with a robust body shape. The tympanum is rounded or slightly flattened on the upper and lower borders; it is almost equal to or larger than eye in males, always smaller than eye in females. Webbing is rudimentary. Breeding males exhibit the following characteristics: broad and fleshy tympanic papilla that is closer to upper border of tympanum, strongly developed forearm hypertrophy, carpal spike, spinosities developed on throat and forearms but hardly on the anterior part of the dorsolateral side, and very small femoral glands (smallest in Central African Petropedetes) that are usually shifted to the posterior part of the femur.


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Comparisons

Petropedetes euskircheni has rudimentary webbing and can easily distinguishable from species with developed webbing (P. palmipes and P. perreti, both fully webbed; P. cameronensis and P. juliawurstnerae, both half-webbed). The presence of a distinct tympanum and a tympanal papilla distinguish P. euskircheni from P. cameronensis and P. palmipes. This species can also be separated from P. vulpiae and P. johnstoni by the size of the femoral gland in these species. In addition, males of P. euskircheni are larger than P. vulpiae and P. johnstoni. P. parkeri and this species are morphologically similar and both have small femoral glands.


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Phylogenetics

The mitochondrial 16S rRNA differs between P. euskircheni and P. parkeri by 5.94-8.69%. Intraspecific variation was 0.00%-3.14% (N= 9) in P. euskircheni, which was higher than in the other taxa. Specimens formed two locality based (Mt. Kupe and Mt. Nlonako) subclusters. The specimens from each cluster showed the same low within site variability as in other Central African Petropedetes species (Mt. Kupe: 0.00%-0.39%; Mt. Nlonako: 0.00%). The genetic differences between vouchers from Mt. Kupe and Mt. Nlonako could not be backed up with morphological characters, and at present male specimens are only known from Mt. Kupe (Barej et al., 2010).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/