AMPHIBIAWEB
Paramesotriton longliensis
Longli Warty Newt; Paramesotriton de Longi
Subgenus: Allomesotriton
family: Salamandridae
subfamily: Pleurodelinae
 
Species Description: Li S,Tian Y-z, Gu X-m, Xiong R-c 2008 A new species of Paramesotriton - Paramesotriton longliensis. Zool Res 29: 313-317

© 2008 Henk Wallays (1 of 2)

AmphibiaChina 中国两栖类.

Conservation Status (definitions)
IUCN (Red List) Status
CITES
Other International Status None
National Status None
Regional Status None

Country distribution from AmphibiaWeb's database: China

 

View distribution map using BerkeleyMapper.

   

From the Encyclopedia of Life account:

Distribution

Known from the type locality Shuichang village, Longli County, Guizhou Province, China, at 1,142 m altitude (Li et al., 2008) and from a river near Shizilu village, Xianfeng County, Hubei, at 787 m elevation (Wu et al., 2010). Specimens from southeastern Chongqing, which is geographically intermediate between western Hubei and the type locality of P. longliensis in central Guizhou, were identified initially as P. chinensis (Xie et al., 2004). These animals are morphologically similar to those from western Hubei and may belong to the same species. Therefore, the geographic range of P. longliensis likely extends from central Guizhou to western Hubei (Wu et al., 2010).


Authors: Wu, Yunke; Sparreboom, Max
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Morphology

The following description is based on the original description by Li et al. (2008), supplemented with a new record on the species' occurrence further North (Wu et al., 2010).

Robust newt with granular skin and prominent vertebral ridge; dorso-lateral ridges vaguely present. Head flattened, longer than wide, snout truncated. Upper labial fold well developed. Tail longer than snout-vent length, high and laterally compressed, with fins on upper- and undersides and ending in a blunt tip. Legs well developed, hind limbs a little longer than forelimbs. When adpressed, hindlimbs and forelimbs meet. No toe webbing or fringes, but black sheath at toe tips. Wu et al. (2010) describe specimens from a population in western Hubei and note that the cloaca is prominent in females, conically shaped. These authors also find light colored lateral stripes in the tail of both males and females, more conspicuous in males than in females. Dorsal color light brown, occasionally taking on the yellow color of the substrate; dorsal ridge yellow. Ventral side black, with scattered, irregular orange-red spots, including one on the underside of the onset of each leg.


Authors: Wu, Yunke; Sparreboom, Max
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Size

All measurements are from Li et al. (2008).

Male (10 specimens). Total length: 101.7–131.1 mm; snout-vent length: 57.6–73.6 mm; head length: 19–25.2 mm; head width: 13.4–18.1 mm; forelimb length: 17.6–24.4 mm; hind-limb length: 18.4–25.5 mm.

Female (10 specimens). Total length: 104.5–140 mm; snout-vent length: 59–79.9 mm; head length: 18.3–23.5 mm; head width: 12.4–17.3 mm; forelimb length: 16.8–27 mm; hind-limb length: 18.4–27.8 mm.


Authors: Wu, Yunke; Sparreboom, Max
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Diagnostic Description

Hind part of epibranchial bone points upwards, resulting in a clearly visible protrusion on both sides of the gill vestiges. Skin very rough, warts densely covering much of dorsal and lateral surfaces. Warts on dorsolateral ridge with yellow or orange tint and sometimes forming discontinuous dorso-lateral stripes. Black sheath at digit tips. Prominent vertebral ridge.


Authors: Wu, Yunke; Sparreboom, Max
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Look Alikes

Paramesotriton longliensis resembles P. chinensis in having a similar body size and very rough skin. Paramesotriton longliensis differs from the latter species by having a visible protrusion on both sides of the gill vestiges, a prominent vertebral ridge and inconspicuous yellow dorso-lateral stripes.


Authors: Wu, Yunke; Sparreboom, Max
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Habitat

Lives in quiet parts of large reservoirs and in the outflow of underground water reservoirs at elevations of 700–1,200 m. Water is clear, containing stones, mud and some vegetation (Li et al., 2008). The population in western Hubei inhabits a large river, ca 10-20 m wide and 1-2 m deep, in a narrow valley (Wu et al., 2010). In Hubei, this newt prefers silty substrate and also can be found near river banks after rains. It is often caught with fishes in seine-nets. During the day Paramesotriton longliensis is usually inactive, hiding under stones, fallen leaves, in the sand or between weeds. It feeds at night, sitting still on the bottom of the water and catching insects, earth worms, shrimp, small fish and snails.


Authors: Wu, Yunke; Sparreboom, Max
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Reproduction

Breeding season from mid April to late June.


Authors: Wu, Yunke; Sparreboom, Max
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Evolution

Despite the large geographic distance between sampling localities (ca 400 km), the two known populations cluster together in genetic analysis and are hence considered to belong to the same species. P. longliensis is genetically similar to P. zhijinensis; the two species are separated by only a modest genetic distance: <2% in uncorrected mitochondrial sequences (Wu et al., 2010). Both species are discovered from Guizhou, which is famous for its karst topography (also covering Chongqing and western Hubei). Underground rivers may connect seemingly isolated areas and allow gene flow among populations (Wu, unpublished).


Authors: Wu, Yunke; Sparreboom, Max
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Genetics

Karyotype:

2n=24, 1M, 2M, 3M, 4M, 5M, 6M, 7SM, 8M, 9M, 10SM, 11SM, 12SM, from Li et al. (2008). M: metacentric; SM: submetacentric

The mitochondrial sequence data are available from Wu et al. (2010).


Authors: Wu, Yunke; Sparreboom, Max
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Conservation

No information is available to allow assessment of a population trend in this species. Given its large distribution range and its absence in the pet trade, Paramesotriton longliensis is likely still abundant in the wild. However, construction of small hydropower stations in Hubei may degrade its natural habitat (Wu, Y., pers. comm.).


Authors: Wu, Yunke; Sparreboom, Max
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/