AMPHIBIAWEB
Hyperolius ademetzi
family: Hyperoliidae

© 2008 Jean-Louis Amiet (1 of 6)

View distribution map using BerkeleyMapper.


Conservation Status (definitions)
IUCN (Red List) Status Near Threatened (NT)
See IUCN account.
CITES No CITES Listing
Other International Status None
National Status None
Regional Status None

   

Description
A Hyperolius from the grasslands of the Cameronese ridge. Males small (17–20 mm), females medium (23–26 mm). Head narrower than in the similar H. kuligae. Dorsum with hour-glass pattern or, more frequently, with light dorsolateral stripes in grey, beige and brown. Gular flap large. Pupils horizontal. Females with yellow ventrum, and red ventral surfaces of legs. Males have a whitish ventrum which is transparent posteriorly.

The males are similar to those of H. cinnamomeoventris, but smaller. The latter sometimes have two darker middorsal lines. For a comparison with the similar H. kuligae and H. platyceps see under the latter.

Distribution and Habitat

Country distribution from AmphibiaWeb's database: Cameroon

View distribution map using BerkeleyMapper.
Only found in savanna at 750–1750 m in the western Cameronese highlands.

Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors
The call consists of a long and rapid succession of very brief shrill buzzes, “zi-zi-zi-zi”. Sometimes an initial sound is heard.

Comments
The spelling H. adametzi has also been used for this species, but Frost (2007) points out that the original specimens were labeled as H. ademetzi and that the alternative spelling was a typographical error by Ahl (1931).

This account was taken from "Treefrogs of Africa" by Arne Schiøtz with kind permission from Edition Chimaira publishers, Frankfurt am Main.

References
 

Ahl, E. (1931). ''Anura III, Polypedatidae.'' Das Tierreich, 55. F. E. Schulze and W. Kuekenthal, eds., Walter de Gruyter, Berlin and Leipzig.  

Frost, D. R. (2007). Amphibian Species of the World: an Online Reference. Version 5.1 (10 October 2007). Electronic Database accessible at http://research.amnh.org/herpetology/amphibia/index.php. American Museum of Natural History, New York, USA.  

Schiøtz, A. (1999). Treefrogs of Africa. Edition Chimaira, Frankfurt am Main.



Written by Arne Schiøtz (arne AT schiotz.dk), *
First submitted 2001-01-10
Edited by Kellie Whittaker (2008-09-10)



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Citation: AmphibiaWeb: Information on amphibian biology and conservation. [web application]. 2014. Berkeley, California: AmphibiaWeb. Available: http://amphibiaweb.org/. (Accessed: Jul 31, 2014).

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