AMPHIBIAWEB
Heleophryne orientalis
Eastern Ghost Frog
family: Heleophrynidae

© 2009 Serban Proches (1 of 1)

Country distribution from AmphibiaWeb's database: South Africa

View distribution map using BerkeleyMapper.


Conservation Status (definitions)
IUCN (Red List) Status Least Concern (LC)
See IUCN account.
CITES
Other International Status None
National Status None
Regional Status None

   

From the Encyclopedia of Life account:

Distribution

This species is endemic to the Western Cape Province of South Africa (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: Boycott, R.C.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Morphology

Tadpoles feed on algae growing on submerged rock surfaces in streams and pools, and they take refuge under loose pebbles and boulders when disturbed. Their colour closely matches that of the water and the substrate on which they feed (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: Bergmann, Travis
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Habitat and Ecology

The terrestrial habitat of H. orientalis is confined to patches of Afro-montane Forest surrounded by Mesic Mountain Fynbos (Moll et al. 1984). This species inhabits clear, slow- to swift-flowing perennial mountain streams in forested ravines and gorges, in areas where the annual rainfall is 600–3000 mm (Boycott 1982). Altitudinal range is 215–500 m (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: Bergmann, Travis
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Advertisement Call

Calling takes place during the day and at night, even up to 02:00. Males call from beneath stones alongside and in streams, from exposed positions such as lichen-covered boulders near waterfalls and cascades, and in caves (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: Boycott, R.C.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Reproduction

H. orientalis breeds in early summer when river and stream flow is reduced. Recorded breeding from the fourth week of October to the end of November, and regarded this species as having the shortest breeding period of all Helophryne species (Visser, 1990). Unlike most of the other Heleophryne species, the males of H. orientalis appear to form breeding aggregations (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: Boycott, R.C.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

IUCN Red List Category and Justification of Conservation Status

H. orientalis occurs abundantly in forested ravines and gorges on the southern slopes of the eastern Langeberg Mountains and is under no threat. The species occurs in several private and public protected areas (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: Boycott,R.C.
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/