AMPHIBIAWEB
Breviceps fichus
family: Brevicipitidae
 
Species Description: Channing and Minter 2004 Afr J Science 53:147-154
Conservation Status (definitions)
IUCN (Red List) Status Least Concern (LC)
CITES
Other International Status None
National Status None
Regional Status None

Country distribution from AmphibiaWeb's database: Tanzania, United Republic of

 

View distribution map using BerkeleyMapper.

   

From the Encyclopedia of Life account:

Size

Males are approximately 35 mm and females 43 mm in snout-vent length (Harper et al., 2010).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Diagnostic Description

This is a rotund frog with a very small head and short limbs. Toes lack webbing. The dorsum is dark brown and the ventral surface is lightly colored. A distinct black mark runs from the eye to the base of each arm. The throat is brown in females and dark black in breeding males (Text from Harper et al., 2010).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Comparisons

Very similar in appearance to B. mossambicus, but the calls are distinctly different. It is thought that the two species do not overlap in range (Harper et al., 2010).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Habitat and Ecology

This species is known from grasslands at elevations above 1500 m (Harper et al., 2010).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Metamorphosis

Juveniles have been observed in March (Harper et al., 2010).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Advertisement Call

Channing and Howell (2006) describe the call as “a pulsed whistle,” with the call most often containing 12 pulses.


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Reproduction

Males call during the day from burrows in dense grass. The breeding period is short, lasting only a few weeks at the start of the rainy season. Because they are underground most of the year, very little is known about their natural history. They are assumed to lay eggs terrestrially that hatch directly into small frogs without passing through a free-swimming larval stage (Harper et al., 2010).


Author: Zimkus, Breda
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/