AMPHIBIAWEB
Afrixalus dorsalis
Striped Spiny Reed Frog
family: Hyperoliidae

© 2016 Daniel Portik (1 of 19)

  hear call (331.0K MP3 file)
  hear call (3638.6K WAV file)

[call details here]

View distribution map using BerkeleyMapper.


Conservation Status (definitions)
IUCN (Red List) Status Least Concern (LC)
See IUCN account.
CITES No CITES Listing
Other International Status None
National Status None
Regional Status None

   

Description
A medium-sized Afrixalus (males 25–28 mm, females 26–29 mm) from bushland localities in West Africa and the coastal regions of Cameroun to coastal Angola. Dorsum dark with a pattern in silverish white, normally consisting of a triangle on top of the snout continuing into a broad dorsolateral stripe to the groin. A light spot in the lumbar region, sometimes confluent with the dorsolateral stripes, and two light spots on tibia, or tibia uniformly light. Although normally constant in pattern, individuals in some populations can vary considerably, e.g. having a light middorsal stripe or even a uniform light dorsum.

Two very similar subspecies are recognised. They are:
A.d. dorsalis from Sierra Leone to southern Cameroun. Tibia with two light spots.
A. d. regularis Laurent 1951 or A. d. leptosomus (Peters 1877) with a light upper side of tibia. Rio Muni to coastal Angola. It is disputed whether the name leptosomus is rather applicable to a member of the fulvovittatus group.

Distribution and Habitat

Country distribution from AmphibiaWeb's database: Angola, Cameroon, Congo, Congo, the Democratic Republic of the, Cote d'Ivoire, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Togo

View distribution map using BerkeleyMapper.
Afrixalus dorsalis is widely distributed and common in bushland localities in the West African forest belt and in forest outliers in the humid savanna. The farthest west I have found it is in eastern Sierra Leone, while apparently suitable localities further west had populations of A. fulvovittatus instead. Towards the east it is recorded commonly from coastal Cameroun to coastal Angola.

Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

The voice consists of an initial sound followed by a number of figures, about 12 per second with a frequency-intensity maximum at 3800–4100 cps.

The eggs are white, surrounded by clear jelly. They are deposited in small clumps on leaves which are then folded and glued together. The tadpoles are streamlined with a terminal mouth and a tooth formula of 0/1.

Comments
This account was taken from "Treefrogs of Africa" by Arne Schiøtz with kind permission from Edition Chimaira publishers, Frankfurt am Main. Updated by A. Schiøtz, 2008.



Written by Arne Schiøtz (arne AT schiotz.dk), *
First submitted 2000-12-25
Edited by Kellie Whittaker (2008-09-30)



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Citation: AmphibiaWeb: Information on amphibian biology and conservation. [web application]. 2016. Berkeley, California: AmphibiaWeb. Available: http://amphibiaweb.org/. (Accessed: May 24, 2016).

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