AMPHIBIAWEB
Leptopelis macrotis
family: Arthroleptidae

© 2008 Arne Schiotz (1 of 1)

View distribution map using BerkeleyMapper.


Conservation Status (definitions)
IUCN (Red List) Status Near Threatened (NT)
See IUCN account.
CITES No CITES Listing
Other International Status None
National Status None
Regional Status None

   

Description
A very large forest Leptopelis (males 40-46 mm, females 74-84 mm) from West Africa with fully webbed feet, a large tympanum and a smooth transversely-striped dorsum in shades of brown. This Leptopelis is unmistakable among the West African Leptopelis, being the largest and most fully webbed member of the genus. When compared with the Cameronese fauna it shows strong similarities to two sympatric species, L. rufus and L. millsoni and to L. palmatus from Principe, but differs in the following characters:

L. palmatus L. rufus L. macrotis L.millsoni
Size of female Very large

(81-110 mm)

Large

(74-87 mm)

Large

(74-84 m)

Smaller

(65-70 mm)

Discs vs. Tympanum Smaller Larger Smaller Smaller
Choanes Very large Large Small Small

Distribution and Habitat

Country distribution from AmphibiaWeb's database: Cote d'Ivoire, Ghana, Liberia, Sierra Leone

View distribution map using BerkeleyMapper.
A forest form, heard whenever suitable localities were visited from central Sierra Leone to Ghana.

Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors
The males call from branches, most typically from near streams at heights of 5-10 m above the ground. The voice consists of a single motif with a duration of 0.1 second, sometimes repeated twice. It has the same acoustical quality as that of L. occidentalis - although audibly different. The sonogram shows a large number of harmonics about 330 cps apart.

Comments
This account was taken from "Treefrogs of Africa" by Arne Schiøtz with kind permission from Edition Chimaira publishers, Frankfurt am Main.

References

Schiøtz, A. (1999). Treefrogs of Africa. Edition Chimaira, Frankfurt am Main.



Written by Arne Schiøtz (arne AT schiotz.dk), *
First submitted 2001-01-31
Edited by Kellie Whittaker (2008-09-10)



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Citation: AmphibiaWeb: Information on amphibian biology and conservation. [web application]. 2016. Berkeley, California: AmphibiaWeb. Available: http://amphibiaweb.org/. (Accessed: Sep 26, 2016).

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