AMPHIBIAWEB
Arthroleptis wahlbergii
Bush squeaker
family: Arthroleptidae

© 2007 Serban Proches (1 of 2)

Country distribution from AmphibiaWeb's database: South Africa

View distribution map using BerkeleyMapper.


Conservation Status (definitions)
IUCN (Red List) Status Least Concern (LC)
See IUCN account.
CITES
Other International Status None
National Status None
Regional Status None

   

From the Encyclopedia of Life account:

Distribution

A. wahlbergi is endemic to the east coast of South Africa, from just south of Port St Johns northward to the Mozambique border. In Kwa- Zulu-Natal, its range extends inland to altitudes of c.1000 m in the mist belt, where it is particularly common (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: Channing, Alan
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

Habitat and Ecology

A. wahlbergi is a forest species, but also occurs in adjacent thickets and grasslands that have dense cover and accumulations of leaf litter. These frogs are common where they occur and frequently inhabit gardens and even alien tree plantations (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: Avila, Andres
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

Associations

Food items include woodlice and other crustaceans, beetles and, probably, other small insects that live in the leaf litter (Wager 1986). Predators of A. wahlbergi have not been recorded (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: Channing, Alan
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

Reproduction

Breeding takes place during spring and summer, with calling commencing immediately after rain (Channing 2001). In wet weather, males may be heard calling throughout the day and night from concealed positions in leaf litter. Clutches of 11–30 eggs are laid in damp leaf litter and develop directly into froglets which hatch and leave the nest after approximately four weeks (Wager 1986; text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: Channing, Alan
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

IUCN Red List Category and Justification of Conservation Status

Although A. wahlbergi is not classified as threatened, in places its habitat is under pressure from housing development and the clearing of bush for agriculture. More detailed distribution information is needed to evaluate the species’ local conservation status (Text from Minter et al., 2004, © SI/MAB Biodiversity Program).


Author: Channing, Alan
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/