AMPHIBIAWEB
Rhinella manu
family: Bufonidae

© 2009 José M. Padial (1 of 3)

Country distribution from AmphibiaWeb's database: Peru

View distribution map using BerkeleyMapper.


Conservation Status (definitions)
IUCN (Red List) Status Vulnerable (VU)
See IUCN account.
CITES
Other International Status None
National Status None
Regional Status None

   

From the IUCN Red List Species Account:

 

Range Description

Rhinella manu is known only from the type locality, Trocha Union Km 6, situated in the Kosñipata Valley (13 06' 91.2" S, 71 17 00' W, 2700–2800 masl), District of Paucartambo, Province of Paucartambo, Department of Cusco, Peru (Chaparro et al., 2007).

Habitat and Ecology

The species inhabits montane cloud forests. The floristic composition of these primary forests includes the following genera: Clusia (Gittiferae), Miconia (Melastomataceae), Hedyosmum (Chloranthaceae), Schefflera (Araliaceae), Oreocallis (Proteaceae), Piper (Piperaceae), Chusquea (Bambusoideae), and Cyatheacea (tree ferns). Other anuran species in the area of the type locality include Pristimantis rhabdolaemus, P. cf. cruralis, Phrynopus cf. peruvianus, and P. cophites. Individuals are found during and directly following the rainy season. Rhinella manu is likely nocturnal and arboreal as all type specimens were encountered at night, on leaves and branches of arboreal ferns (Cyathea), 50 cm–2 m above the ground. Most individuals have been found in areas without standing water (Chaparro et al., 2007).

Population

This is considered to be a rare species (J.C. Chaparro, pers. comm. 2008).

Population Trend

Unknown

Major Threats

Although the species is found within the boundaries of Manu National Park, there are areas that are open to tourism, including Trocha Union, where there is a project to develop a camp site at the type locality, which would bring more tourism but also cause more impacts on the area (J.C. Chaparro, pers. comm. 2008).

Conservation Actions

The species' type locality is within the limits of the Manu Biosphere Reserve in southeastern Peru (Chaparro et al., 2007).

Taxonomic Notes

Rhinella manu can be distinguished from all known Rhinella by a unique combination of external and osteological characters as well as by molecular data (Chaparro et al., 2007).

Citation

Juan Carlos Chaparro 2008. Rhinella manu. In: IUCN 2014

 

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